Dear Running, it’s not you, it’s me. I’m tired, it’s cold outside, and we haven’t been on a race date in such a long time. The spark isn’t there like it was back in November, when we spent that long weekend at the marathon in New York City. Maybe it’s time for me to see other sports, and you to see other athletes…

We all feel like this once in a while. The mileage adds up, and it can really wear you down both physically and mentally. Sometimes the best way to salvage your running relationship is to spend a little time apart.

notyou

After taking some time off, you’ll be craving the feeling that only running can give you. Your passion will return, your body will be fully rested, and you’ll be ready to make running a part of your daily routine again.

Here a few other ways to keep your relationship from getting stale:

  • Run without a watch. You CAN do it. Run by feel, and listen to your body. Learn to run easy, medium, and hard based on effort. If you absolutely must measure your performance or track your miles, hide your watch and don’t look at it until you finish your run.
  • Take the scenic way home and discover some new routes. I looked at my running log for 2014, and realized that I ran the same 6-mile route 49 times over the past year. Blaaghh! Variety is the spice of life.
  • If you’re a pavement runner, try running off-road for a change. It will make things interesting, connect you with the natural world, and improve your leg strength and agility. Lose the watch and take a water bottle with you to make it even more authentic.
  • Run with a friend. The miles will fly by, and you’ll enjoy safety in numbers. Nothing makes the miles easier than an engaging conversation with a friend.
  • Enter a race just for fun every 6 to 8 weeks.  It’s a great way to spend time with other runners, and it helps keep things fresh in the off-season.

Have you felt this way? How do you rekindle your romance with running?

2 thoughts on “Dear Running, It’s Not You, It’s Me.

  1. Distance- A “break up” from the usual running routine, will make the “heart grow fonder”!! I’m already doing so many of the above right now! Love this perspective!

    1. Thanks, Kara! This is a good time of year to take a breather and reflect on all of the great things you accomplished as a runner in the past 12 months. For some of us, that means a total break from running, for others just reducing mileage and effort. I’m finding the freedom to run without a goal race in front of me quite enjoyable. Thanks for stopping by!

Thoughts?